kate-bingaman-burt

WOMENSPEAK No. 5 KATE BINGAMAN-BURT

Kate Bingaman-Burt, a graphic designer, illustrator, and associate professor of graphic design at Portland State University, has her finger on the pulse of design. Her Instagram is chock full of inspiration, and her website even offers a free, 45 minute, zine-making tutorial. She is well known for her projects based on personal consumerism.

BINGAMAN-BURT: One of my favorite things to do is to travel by myself in places that I don’t really know. Where everything feels new and different. I enjoy riding through the city on my scooter quite a bit, because it is a different sensory experience than in the car.

I smell, hear, and see my surroundings in a totally different way; I am so much more
aware.

SOLIS: What is your illustration process?

BINGAMAN-BURT: All of my freelance work starts on paper. I haven’t figured out how
to use a tablet effectively. I am really nerdy about line quality, and I know that I can get there with the tablet, I just haven’t yet; therefore, I scan everything in. I use this program, Vector Magic. It is so dorky, but it converts to vector really well. I do a lot of my illustrations in parts and pieces, and once I get them into the computer, I start arranging, copying and pasting, using textures or transparencies. It becomes a collage of my own drawings. It is a real push and pull, between the computer, and the hand.

SOLIS: How do you see social media, and the Internet impacting illustration?

BINGAMAN-BURT: Hand-drawn illustration has become really popular over the last several years, which is interesting. With that, I have noticed the terms plagiarism, appropriation and inspiration have gotten even fuzzier. I think a lot of it has to do with the Internet and the endless amount of images available at our fingertips. It is so easy to mindlessly consume imagery without even thinking about it. With that being said, I believe it has also become easy to adopt others’ ideas as your own, even subconsciously.

As a teacher and freelance artist, I want to be incredibly conscious and aware of what I am putting out, as a result of what is coming in. If you are an artist, you have to figure out how not to contribute to the social media’s pile of goop. You have to ask yourself, “What is my point of view, and how do I want it to communicate with people?” After you figure that out, then you make piles of it, claim it as your own and put your stamp on it. Many of my projects wouldn’t have been nearly as successful, if I hadn’t made like 3,200 drawings in total–– repetition is so powerful.

SOLIS: What did you want to be growing up?

BINGAMAN-BURT: All throughout high school, I wanted to be a journalist. I came from a family of artists, but I wanted to write. My parents were weavers growing up, they would travel all over selling their tapestries at different art shows. They did that for several years. I never felt super poor, but I knew that unless I got scholarships, I wouldn’t be attending any major university. I ended up going to a work-study college in Branson, Mo., the College of the Ozarks, and it was so small and bizarre, but I didn’t have to pay for school. Through my experiences there, I realized that I didn’t want to major in journalism, and ended up falling in love with graphic design.

SOLIS: What inspired you to begin illustrating?

BINGAMAN-BURT: My grandparents were illustrators, but I never enjoyed drawing as a kid. I thought drawing was very specific, in that all forms should look “real,” and that did not interest me at all. My illustrating began with a personal project that involved my relationship with money. From 2002 to 2004, I was photo-documenting everything I purchased. Also, during this time, I was going from garage sale to garage sale, and asking people about their financial situations; the haves and the have not’s. I feel fairly safe in saying that everyone has a complicated relationship with money. These days, we are all so quick to share via social media, with people that we don’t even know, intimate details of our life; yet, we still don’t talk about the debt we may have, or purchases that we shouldn’t have made. At the end of the project, I felt like a giant hypocrite. I had asked all these people for the past 28 months about their relationship toward money, while at that point, I was $26,000 in debt, and hadn’t told a soul. I decided to turn my debt situation into a project, and I wanted to pick a medium that I felt dually uncomfortable with, which was drawing. I began drawing my credit card statements every month, until they were paid off. Drawing all these statements was the equivalent of writing on a chalkboard, “I won’t be stupid with money,” over and over again. The first night I posted online, I couldn’t sleep. I felt so vulnerable and embarrassed; however, in the end, so many great things came from this project, such as my love for drawing.

SOLIS: Who is your biggest influence?

BINGAMAN-BURT: My grandmother. She had this awesome studio in the basement of her house, and I can still remember what it smelled like (a really toxic spray adhesive). All of her work was done from 9 p.m. until 2 a.m., so that her work never interfered with her being a mother. I have no idea how she did that, because I just know my grandfather didn’t help with anything, but it was a much different time. She was born in 1925 in Germany. A day after her birth, when the nurses weren’t watching, her mom committed suicide by jumping out of the hospital window––it was tragic. Her aunt ended up raising her because her father didn’t know how to take care of a baby girl. Eventually, she went to art school. I have some of the scrapbooks that she made when she was 14 or 15 years old, in which she would practice different lettering styles, and copy movie posters. Later, when she was 19 years old, she was approached by a children’s book company, which asked her to illustrate a book. After that, I kid you not, she worked consistently until she was 75, because of the strong relationships she made, and her ability to deliver quality product. She ended up illustrating over 1,000 different coloring books, and children’s books. I know that if her vision hadn’t failed, she would have continued to illustrate until the end.

SOLIS: It must have been challenging for her as a woman illustrator during that generation?

BINGAMAN-BURT: She always played second fiddle to my grandpa, a combat illustrator during wartime, and portrait artist after. Whenever there were newspaper or magazine articles, they were always about my grandpa. There was a series in the Kenosha, Wis. newspaper, where my grandparents lived, that was called The Wives and They’re Lives. It was a weekly article that featured the wife of an important man in the community. It was supposed to be this big honor, but really it was so demeaning. I have the article that featured her framed in my home studio. It is so funny, because she was the one that really ran the family. So at least today, we don’t have a column called, The Wives and They’re Lives.

Womenspeak is a blog published periodically on the Windowwall website. It’s author, Danielle Solis, is a hair stylist and writer.

POSTED November 18th 2015
Photo of top Portland Hair Colorist Kelly Wright at WINDOWWALL Salon

Kelly Wright Colorist

WW is so happy to announce the welcoming of Kelly Wright to our salon. She arrived from NYC and worked at one of the top New York Salons, Arrojo Salon, as a Lead Color Educator for seven years and has been doing color for ten. This lady knows color which is way beyond understanding the color wheel. This is understanding how hair as a fibers id going to react and what to expect during the process. She has developed such great understanding by the high volume of New York City denizens she had as her clients.

She is something special, originally from New Orleans with a downtown style. WW couldn’t be happier to have her join our team. Kelly can take you platinum and give you the dusty shade of pink you have been desiring, she can tint your hair dark and leave it with the tonal value you are wanting, she can correct any color that you are not liking and make it look cool, modern and perfectly on point. She has the style to give you what you are looking for.

She can also give you options as to how to maintain to make it more economical. We have introduced a few new options to our menu, so in between you can maintain your color for less than the introduction cost of changing your look. Book a complimentary consultation with Kelly and explore the world of color and hear what she recommends as well as showing her photos of what you are desiring. You will not be disappointed you did!

xo, Kim

POSTED November 6th 2015
Photo of Arrojo hair products at Portland's WINDOWWALL Salon.

Arrojo Products are here!

Each one of our clients know exactly how WW loves Phyto and forever will because of the endless times we have seen it work miracles. Although we have been searching up and down for the perfect styling products to offer to our clients. We have done our research and have established new relationships in the industry.. and let me tell you that when choosing a product line it is so very important that it reflects similarly to the same philosophies that we hold with our products. We needed products to create desired looks that we have been wanting to mold and sculpt… Such as: sleek, messy, textural, shiny, matte, glossy, conditioned or the perfect amount of matte with an enhancement of shine.

And you guessed it… ARROJO! These products are seriously everything, from the simple, clean modern package design to the scent these products have… um, wow! Not to mention, they all are paraben and sodium lauryl sulfate free, uphold UV protection in each of them and can fight off any humidity if a client is wanting a straight look to last.

Nick Arrojo is the new leading stylist that is similar to Vidal creator or Vidal Sassoon, Michael Gordon’s Bumble and Bumble and Horst Rechelbacher creator of Aveda. He is the new man in the industry, having three salons in NY and recently opening a Cosmetology School. I couldn’t be more happy to develop relations with their team and get to share these smart products with our clientele. We were the first salon in Portland to carry the line and couldn’t be more excited!

POSTED November 1st 2015
Photos of wedding dress designer Elizabeth Dye

WOMENSPEAK No. 3 ELIZABETH DYE

Elizabeth Dye, a Portland native, designs wedding dresses––beautiful, elegant, and timeless pieces that inspire brides, and those who hope to be one. We met in her Northwest studio where I became a little girl again, and ogled at the beautiful dresses hanging in the sunlight.

DYE: The very first wedding dresses I designed were for friends, because even though today’s brides have a lot of choices, when I started out that was not true. Unless you had a lot of money to spend, you pretty much had to go to a terrible bridal salon with scary old ladies that would try to talk you into some polyester cupcake monstrosity. The vast majority of my friends could not identify with that experience at all, and were borderline traumatized by the idea. My friends knew I made clothes, and they began approaching me with their visions. Then, like with anything, if you start doing something and you get good at it, you just get more of it. Over time, I started to see patterns, certain things that brides wanted, and I recognized that certain dresses needed to simply exist and did not need to be designed from scratch every time. I also got more confident in my design abilities and developed my own style. I launched my first line in 2010, and it was a culmination of my experiences as a custom designer.

SOLIS: Tell me about your former bridal boutique, The English Department?

DYE: I opened the shop in 2005. It didn’t start out as bridal, it was originally street clothing. After being open a year, I brought in some simple, alternative wedding dresses, and they just took off. It was the part of the business that was clearly growing, and after moving locations from Northwest 23rd to our current location on Southwest Alder, I decided that the shop really needed to be either street wear or bridal. At that time, it became really obvious which way the shop should go, because the bridal portion of the shop was booming. As the shop grew, I couldn’t do it all––design custom dresses, run the boutique, and design my own line. So I stopped doing custom dresses, and I ran the shop side-by-side with my line for about three or four years before my head exploded because it was all too much. *Laughs

In 2013, I sold the shop. I still have a great relationship with the new owners, and I sell my dresses there, but the sale allowed me to step away and focus on wholesale. I occasionally do a custom dress now for fun, but most of the time, I don’t have the time. I design two collections a year, and the minute we are done with one, it is time to start on the next one; however, with selling to about 25 stores around the world, I have been able to do a lot of traveling now.

SOLIS: Do you remember a time when you were terrified to design a dress?

DYE: I do! I would say that the scariest dresses I had to design were projects that I took on without knowing exactly how to craft the dress in the first place. Ultimately, I think that is how we all learn, though, by being a little uncomfortable. There was one dress in particular that gave me a hard time, and it was in silk chiffon. It had these really elaborate pleats across the front. I had stitched all the pleats down so that they wouldn’t shift around, and were stabilized. When the bride came in for the final fitting, and we were going to pull out all of the stabilizing threads, I realized that I had no idea if it was going to work at all. Her mom was there, and the pressure was on. I pulled out the threads, and the whole dress sprung out. It actually turned out great, but there were beads of sweat dripping down my face for sure.

SOLIS: How did you learn your craft?

DYE: Well, I actually am an English major. I am a totally self-taught designer. I did not have a mentor, and I totally should have. I think I was super stubborn and just wanted to do it on my own, which is absolutely the most stupid and longest way to do anything. But I have a lot of friends and colleagues who along the way have helped me out with tips and advice. I always tell interns, “Don’t do anything I did. By being an intern, you are already way ahead of me.

SOLIS: You just designed a new ready-to-wear resort collection. What prompted this?

DYE: I did. Doing bridal wear, you don’t deal with a lot of color, and I love really punchy prints. I am obsessed with Palm Springs, and I think that I have a fantasy lifestyle, wherein I would make all the clothing for such a place. Right now, it is just an experimental line so that I can branch out creatively. It won’t necessarily be available for purchase. I want everything I design to be perfected before being sold to the public. There is a lot of clothing in the world, and I like knowing that the pieces I am designing have a purpose and are special. I like knowing that someone is not going to just turn around and eBay it right away. With bridal, I know that I am creating a keepsake that will last forever, and it is so fulfilling. I am definitely not above fast fashion, but I don’t want to make that.

SOLIS: Have you always been drawn to the idea of escapism through fashion?

DYE: I think fashion with a capital “F,” like pure fashion design, is fantasy. It is about using clothes as a way to manifest an alternate reality. For me, especially on a rainy Portland day, that alternate reality is resort wear. Resort in so many ways is the opposite of my day to day. It is a getaway, and that is what makes fashion so much fun. In life there are so many things that we don’t have control over, so when people are like, “ I don’t care about clothes,” I think that is such a missed opportunity to just be somebody different for the day.

SOLIS: Do you have anything in your personal wardrobe that is particularly special to you?

DYE: The most special thing I own is a little sequin jacket I found at an antique store for nine dollars. It is too fragile to wear, but I love the handiwork, and its one-of-a-kind quality. I think it is from the 20s or 30s, and it is comprised of actual gelatin sequins. The way you can tell is by looking at the piece and where somebody perspired, the sequins have kind of melted. If I dumped the jacket in water, all of the sequins would dissolve. A while ago, a friend gave me a vintage sequin dress, but it was a little dirty so I thought I would just soak it. I totally ruined it. It turned into this gluey, disgusting mess––I was mortified.

Womenspeak is a blog published periodically on the Windowwall website. It’s author, Danielle Solis, is a hair stylist and writer.

POSTED September 2nd 2015
Photos of Charlotte Wenzel by Danielle Solis

­­WOMENSPEAK No. 2 CHARLOTTE WENZEL

It’s surprising that Charlotte Wenzel isn’t an artist. Her store, Palace, is filled with colorful, bold textures and artifacts that range from clothing to home goods. Carefully curated and designed, the shop invites you into its arms, and subsequently leaves yours full.

Since moving to Portland in 2011, Palace has provided me with countless birthday, Christmas, and anniversary gifts, which is not only a testament to the products, but to its owner, as well. A true Portland gem, Palace opened in January 2010 in its previous space off of Southeast Belmont and 34th. Setting her intentions on making clients feel as if they were stepping into a secret space, Charlotte’s Palace was born. Now in its fifth year, and in a new location off of Southeast Burnside, the shop has expanded, but has maintained the same panache as its predecessor. I have one hell of a crush, and so much respect for this inspirational lady.

SOLIS: You’re so busy, Charlotte!

WENZEL: I just knew this would happen. I showed up this morning and there was already a line formed outside the door.

SOLIS: Well it gave me time to try on a Rag & Bone dress that I now can’t live without. This whole month is so full of weddings, dinners, and events that I don’t even know how not to shop right now.

WENZEL: I love that dress. I just love navy and black together.

SOLIS: Your color palate within the shop has always been one of my favorite things about the space, everything is so well color blocked and organized. What inspired you to open Palace in the first place?

WENZEL: Well it was kind of a chain of events. I always thrifted when I was younger, and when I moved here from California, I found out that you could sell what you thrifted to other stores. So while doing that, I also became a full time eBay seller, and then eventually opened a vintage shop with my friend, Honey. We called it Rad Summer. It was my first brick and mortar experience, and I really enjoyed the act of putting a space together. After it became a collective, I decided to part ways—just because I would rather learn from and take credit for my mistakes, than share my successes and failures with a group. So I left the collective, and went on a trip a week later to Europe with my husband. It was the best thing for me at the time, because having worked full time since I was 15, I didn’t really know what to do with myself. I was anxious because I realized I get so much of my self-identity through my work.

SOLIS: So a lot of drinking under the Eiffel Tower––I’ve done it and it can be very therapeutic––but is that how you decided to jumpstart a new business?

WENZEL: Well, when we got back to Portland the space on Southeast 34th had been vacant for about six months. It had been a record shop beforehand, and every day it just really nagged at me that it was still empty. So I thought, “Well, if I can learn how to sell new clothing, it could be an exciting new challenge.” So I got the space, and all of a sudden I was doing another store.

SOLIS: Was the plan always to incorporate vintage with new?

WENZEL: Yes. I wanted the vintage and new clothing to feel equally special, and I wanted to only carry vintage that was timeless. I want to carry pieces that although they may have been made in the 70s, they are still relevant to fashion today.

SOLIS: What woman isn’t searching for a sense of timelessness––to be a classic, yet modern woman? Would you say your personal wardrobe is inspired by the same mantra?

WENZEL: [laughing] Japanese kids are literally my biggest style inspiration. For me 8- to 10-year-old Japanese kids are style geniuses.

SOLIS: Kids in general can be so inspiring when it comes to art and design.

WENZEL: I agree. That is where I draw a lot of inspiration for my interiors, probably because I like spaces to feel accessible and warm. I’ve been to shops where I feel out of place or not welcome because of the stuffy and uninviting atmosphere. I just knew that I never wanted someone to feel that way in my store. Hence, the warm colors and textures that envelop the space.

SOLIS: I really enjoy how you showcase female artisans, and how you represent women. I always feel an underlying sense of feminism in Palace, and it feels so refreshing.

WENZEL: Thank you! There was this cool moment that happened while watching a documentary on Kathleen Hanna, The Punk Singer, and I became so pumped with her tenacity and with women in general. There are many aspects of being a woman that are challenging and difficult, and so often we don’t have the support we deserve. After viewing the documentary, I vowed that if I had an opportunity to support other women, I would take it.

Womenspeak is a blog published periodically on the WINDOWWALL website. It’s author, Danielle Solis, is a hair stylist and writer.

POSTED July 22nd 2015
Photo of Liz Mehl

WOMENSPEAK NO. 1 Liz Mehl

Liz Mehl is real life. Whether you are interested in the complexities of literature and poetry or inclined to discuss more absolute topics, the conversation will never dwindle or teeter toward boring. Her dedication and passion for the poetry community and the art
that inspires it is sincere, and her latest endeavor is a godsend for those who share her passion.

Already in its second year, Poetry Press Week, which takes place twice annually in Portland, showcases multiple poets to an audience of publishers, press, and the public; it is a breeding ground for creativity and possibilities.

Liz’s semi-annual event provides artists with the publicity they deserve by offering opportunities for growth and exposure that heretofore did not exist.The event’s success doesn’t surprise me. Inspired by the Fashion Industry’s “Fashion Week,” Liz and her co-founder, Justin Rigamonti, have created an haute couture event for poetry.

A few days after this year’s first showcase, I caught up with Liz over a cup of coffee.

SOLIS: Congratulations on your 4th Poetry Press Week. I’m so happy I was able to attend
the showcase this year.

MEHL: Oh, thank you. I loved having you there!

SOLIS: Do you remember the moment that led you to its conception?

MEHL: I remember the exact moment. I was watching a channel called Cinémoi, which no longer exists. I don’t watch much TV, but I would watch Cinémoi, because it was all about fashion, all the time. So one night, I was drinking red wine, and watching this show on a 10-year retrospective of Paris Fashion Week. It was really cool to watch year after year how the clothing changed, or the brand changed. It really is a brilliant event, in that it brings clothing designers out with their new work, which hasn’t been sold or debuted anywhere yet, and places it in front of those who can and will buy it, publicize it, critique it, and wear it. The very first Fashion Week was created to bring the designers that were making the clothes out of their workshops and forward. They were saying, “these are the people that are making your clothes, you should buy them just like you are buying the brand.” So I began to think about how this could happen for poetry as well.

SOLIS: Such a fresh perspective; what changes do you hope your event will evoke?

MEHL: I hope that by making the work more readily available, and having the publishers, which have the power to publish them, right there in the audience that it will expedite the publication process. I also want the press to write about the poets, and their shows, and critics to critique, and the general public to simply come and enjoy and hopefully find inspiration.

SOLIS: So you are hoping that by expediting the publication process, the work will maintain its relevancy?

MEHL: Exactly. As a poet it is so hard to get your work in front of the publishers. You have to practically go up, something akin to, a salmon ladder, and if you’re lucky, you’ll make it out of the slush pile. Usually by the time the work passes through the right hands and is published, it can be, say, 5 years old. For example, you may have work debuting in 2018, referencing something like the Boston Marathon bombings in 2013. Not that an historical event is ever too late to talk about—we should continue to talk about them as that’s how we collectively process the human story—but there’s something powerful in getting to publish a book referencing the subject matter at hand within a year of the event itself. Being current translates to being relevant.

SOLIS: Relevancy is important for so many industries, the fashion industry being one of them. What inspires your own personal fashion and how you express yourself through clothing?

MEHL: I am super into––and always have been, even as a child–– texture and quality. If the fabric doesn’t feel right, I just can’t wear it; it will just bug me. I have trouble wearing polyester, not because it isn’t great, but because personally the texture drives me crazy. I would much rather wear cotton or linen, something that feels good, that will wear well over time. I will go through racks of clothes and pick out pieces of clothing just by the feel of the fabric.

SOLIS: I love that. It reminds me of how I can be with a lot of decisions I make. For
instance, while picking out a new apartment, I can tell instantly whether or not I want to
live there just by the feel of the space, or the sound of my voice in the room.

MEHL: Totally, and I don’t think that is a super common trait. I will go shopping with
friends and they will still be looking through the shirt rack, while I’ve been all over the
store.

SOLIS: The texture and weight of the fabric is key, would you say poetry inspires your
wardrobe?

MEHL: There could be a correlation. I am inspired by texture and quality, and poetry can
be full of texture, but it can also lend itself toward minimalism. Like a minimalistic
garment, when poetry is bare and contains fewer embellishments, you can really see the
bones and structure of the piece, and that is a thing of beauty.

Womenspeak is a blog published periodically on the Windowwall website. It’s author, Danielle Solis, is a
hair stylist and writer.

POSTED July 6th 2015
Photo of grey hair at WINDOWWALL Salon in Portland

Grey Hair Coverage

IT MAY BE THE TREND TONE OF THE FASHIONABLY YOUTHFUL, BUT WHENEVER GREY STARTS SHOWING UP NATURALLY IN THE HAIR, MOST PEOPLE FEEL LESS THAN FABULOUS, REGARDLESS OF AGE.

IT’S NO SECRET GREYING DOES A NUMBER ON THE HAIR. IT GROWS IN COARSER, WIREY, DULLER, AND HARDER TO STYLE. IT TENDS TO WASH OUT NATURAL BLONDES, DRABS REDHEADS AND CLASHES WITH BRUNETTES. GREY IS STILL THE NUMBER ONE REASON PEOPLE COLOR THEIR HAIR. GREAT HAIRCOLOR CAN RESTORE VIBRANCY AND SHINE, SOFTEN TEXTURE AND IMPROVE MANAGEABILITY.

AT THE SIGHT OF THEIR FIRST PREMATURE GREYS, CLIENTS ASK ME, “WHAT SHOULD I DO?” GONE ARE THE DAYS OF JUST “DOES SHE OR DOESN’T SHE?” I LIKE TO EXPLORE THE DIVERSITY OF COLOR SERVICES THAT CAN BE TAILORED TO THE INDIVIDUAL. WHEN IT COMES TO COLORING GREY, CONSIDER WHETHER YOU WANT TO COMPLETELY COVER IT, OR JUST BLEND IT WITH YOUR OWN COLOR.

EVEN THOSE WHO EMBRACE THEIR GREY CAN BENEFIT FROM A COLOR GLOSS. IT ENHANCES THE GREY WITH PEARLY TONES AND NEUTRALIZES ANY YELLOW, WHILE IMPROVING CONDITION AND SHINE.

HIGHLIGHTING OR LOWLIGHTING IS A NATURAL BUT SOPHISTICATED APPROACH TO BLENDING AWAY GREY. WITH HIGHLIGHTS, BRIGHTER BLONDE STRANDS CATCH THE EYE, MAKING GREYS SEEM MORE PLATINUM AND SOFTENING OVERALL APPEARANCE WITH A FRESH YOUTHFUL GLOW.

FOR THOSE WITH NATURALLY DARKER HAIR, LOWLIGHTS ARE A GREAT OPTION. COLORISTS PAINT ONLY ONTO SELECT HAIRS, CREATING A MORE STRIKING “SALT AND PEPPER” CONTRAST. THE DEEPER TONES MAKE THE REMAINING GREY POP AND LOOK MORE SILVERY AND REFINED.

GREY BLENDING USES DEMI-PERMANENT COLOR TO GIVE TONE TO GREY HAIR. WHILE ITS LIMITED IN ONLY DEPOSITING, AND NOT LIGHTENING, DEMI-PERMANENT COLOR IS THE MOST GENTLE PROCESS ON THE HAIR, OFFERING ZERO DAMAGE AND HIGH SHINE. GREY BLENDING IS IDEAL FOR THOSE WHO AREN’T ABLE TO MAKE IT TO THE SALON AS OFTEN, WITH MINIMAL REGROWTH AS THE COLOR SLOWLY FADES IN INTENSITY OVER TIME.

PERMANENT COLOR IS BEST FOR FULL COVERAGE. YET A SINGLE PROCESS, OR FULL HEAD OF COLOR CAN LOOK FLAT, UNIFORM AND UNNATURAL. SOME OF THE WORST COLOR CORRECTIONS I’VE SEEN HAVE BEEN OVERSATURATED HOME SINGLE PROCESS COLORS. A GOOD COLORIST WITH ATTENTION TO DETAIL KNOWS HOW TO PREVENT HAIRCOLOR FROM BECOMING MONOCHROMATIC: WORKING IN HIGHLIGHTS OR BALAYAGE FOR DIMENSION, AND TONERS OR GLOSSES TO REFRESH AND BALANCE FOR NATURAL LOOKING RESULTS.

AS WITH ANY NEW HAIRCOLOR, ITS IMPORTANT TO CONSIDER THE MAINTENANCE: BOTH IN THE SALON AND AT HOME. DIMENSIONAL HIGHLIGHTS OR LOWLIGHTS MIGHT ONLY NEED TO BE FRESHENED UP EVERY 6-8 WEEKS. YET DEPENDING ON THE AMOUNT OF GREY IN THE HAIR, SINGLE PROCESS COLORS MAY REQUIRE RETOUCH EVERY 3-6 WEEKS. WHEN GREYS COME IN PROMINENTLY IN THE PARTING, A POWDER LIKE COLOR WOW ROOT COVER UP IS A GREAT WAY TO EXTEND COVERAGE UNTIL THE NEXT HAIRCOLOR RETOUCH.

THE RIGHT PRODUCTS AT HOME ARE ALSO ESSENTIAL FOR THE BEST HAIR CONDITION AND COLOR LONGEVITY. REGULAR SHAMPOO ISN’T ENOUGH. A GOOD COLOR PROTECTING SHAMPOO, LIKE PHYTO’S PHYTOCITRUS SHAMPOO, GENTLY CLEANSES THE HAIR WHILE LOCKING IN COLOR. DEEP CONDITIONING TREATMENTS AT HOME ARE ALSO A MUST, AND THE PHYTOCITRUS COLOR PROTECT RADIANCE MASK NOURISHES COLOR-TREATED HAIR FOR LONG LASTING VIBRANCY, SOFTNESS AND SHINE.

CURIOUS ABOUT YOUR OPTIONS? CALL WINDOWWALL AT 503-309-6008 TO SCHEDULE A COMPLIMENTARY CONSULTATION.

xo, WW

POSTED May 25th 2015
Photo of the new WINDOWWALL Salon in SE Portland

Suite 323

I am so excited to announce that WW has moved down the hallway to occupy our new space in Suite 323!  With over 1400 square feet we have made our new home feel luxurious as we continually strive to offer the best to our clients.

For the new WINDOWWALL, I wanted to create a space that felt open, airy, spacious and minimal.  I wanted the focus to be on the hair and less about the environment or all of the stuff around.  We love how high our ceilings are with a view that looks over SE industrial and downtown.  With our high ceilings, our salon never smells like chemicals, which is fantastic.  The space has been described as gender neutral which was a wonderful compliment.  Our environment feels inspirational and more like an art gallery and less of a salon.  Our clients come to us because we are the best salon for modern hair and I wanted to give them an atmosphere that reflected that exact philosophy.  Our extensive playlist is curated and updated weekly to ensure that we’re always hearing something new and exciting.

WW now feels exclusive from the outside but is always inclusive once you step through our doors.  I wanted to create an environment that all women, men and transgender individuals feel comfortable in.  I want them to feel not exposed to the “outside world” as they receive a new look and/or have an appointment to take away the grays.  I wanted each client to feel as if they have a safe and secure space high above the pedestrian and street traffic to get their hair done.

WINDOWWALL is something curated, something unique, a home away from home.  We truly enjoy what we do and the people that are our clients!  Thank you all for your support!  We wouldn’t be able to do this without each of you!

xo, Kim

POSTED April 7th 2015
Photo of Oloaplex for blondes at WINDOWWALL Salon

Olaplex is here

As a hairdresser we see every trend, new products and marketing that is designed to pull us in.  This is true for many industries, but the salon world has to be one of the most highly saturated markets.  This isn’t to say great products don’t get introduced, but I would say… that I am often a bit skeptical.

I’ve been waiting for the hype to die down around Olaplex for some time, but in fact it has been the opposite.  My colleagues have been texting me and asking if I’ve tried it while expressing their love for this new state-of-the-art technology.  I follow other high-end salons across the country on Instagram that are posting before-and-after shots with color results you wouldn’t be able to achieve without out this product.  And, celebrity colorist Tracey Cunningham uses it on her celebrity clientele.  You know the rule of thumb: blondes always want to be blonder.

This product is like an insurance plan to your hair.  It’s like magic!  It rebuilds the bonds of the hair while lifting the hair.  Do you want to be blonder, but your colorist tells you no?  Do you want to strip the black hair tint from your hair, but do not want to end up as a red head?  Do you want a iconic all-over platinum that is icy blonde?  There are many results that we as colorists take great precautions of assessing the end results while always maintaining the integrity of the hair.  Of course, we always want to give the client what they want, but often times the chemicals on the hair do not allow for such.  With Olaplex, we will be able to bring you closer to the looks that you are wanting like never before.

WINDOWWALL has added this to our menu.  Please ask your stylist this revolutionary product.  xo, Kim

POSTED February 5th 2015
Photo of Portland hair stylist Danielle Solis

Back on the town…

Our fabulous Danielle Solis has returned to WINDOWWALL part-time. Her first day hitting the floor will be Jan. 8th 2015. We were so sad that she had left, but admired the strength to follow her aspirations of pursing art direction. During her time away she came to realize that hair complimented her new pursuits and with that she continues to be inspired at WW. She is glad to be back and part of the team!

I need to brag a little bit by saying we have some of the most talented artist, makers and designers coming into WW for exceptional hair here in Portland. Our clients love dressing up for us and how we LOVE it even more. There is an energy that takes place in the salon. We often hear that people feel right at home and sometimes even leave with a new friend. As far as the return of Danielle we are honored to say she has made WINDOWWALL her own home away from home. Danielle realized that she had missed these exceptional talented clients, she wanted to step back in and offer her expertise.

Danielle has mastered the art of Balayage before it had become this fierce trend. She studied with a French hair dresser that mastered his trade in New York. He later moved to Nashville to bring his expertise to a new client base and this is where Danielle had the great opportunity to study and apprentice under him. Danielle has a soft natural approach to color. She gives you the dimension you are looking for while keeping your hair healthy and shiny. Most balayage applications leave your hair looking over-processed and brittle. This is not a result you will ever see leaving from Danielle’s chair. I love the looks she creates! If you want something young, trendy, sexy and beachy this is your girl!

Book with Danielle Thursdays and Saturdays: 503-309-6008.

xo, Kim

POSTED January 4th 2015